Departmental Performance Report (DPR) 2011-2012

 

The original version was signed by

The Honourable Robert Nicholson, P.C., Q.C.
Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

 

Table of Contents

Message from the Registrar

Section I: Organizational Overview

Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Section III: Supplementary Information

Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Endnotes


Message from the Registrar

Picture of Roger Bilodeau, Registrar

I am pleased to present the 2011-2012 Departmental Performance Report for the Supreme Court of Canada.

The Supreme Court of Canada is Canada's final court of appeal. The Office of the Registrar of the Supreme Court of Canada has a deep appreciation for the importance of the Court's role and focuses its efforts on a single strategic outcome, namely that "the administration of Canada's final court of appeal is effective and independent".

Over the course of the period covered by this report, the core work of the Office continues to be the processing and management of cases brought to the Court. As in past years, the Court's decision-making environment has continued to present new risks, challenges and opportunities.

The implementation of an electronic document and records management system has continued to progress. In parallel, our business transformation initiative has continued to progress to facilitate the adaptation of business processes in an electronic environment. The work accomplished to date has brought the Court closer to its goal of improving electronic access to the Court's case files and information, both for internal use by the Court as well as by the public and litigants.

In addition to the above, the Court has pursued efforts to enhance the Court's overall security program to better meet the needs of the Court, including the security of its Information Technology (IT), where significant measures were put in place to further ensure the continuing safeguard of the Court's information assets.

In collaboration with PWGSC, concrete steps have been taken to plan a major refurbishment project for the aging infrastructure of the Supreme Court of Canada building.

I wish to conclude with heartfelt thanks to the entire staff of the Court for their continuing hard work and enthusiasm in serving the Court and Canadians with professionalism and a dedicated sense of purpose.

 

Roger Bilodeau, Q.C.


Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d'être

Created by an Act of Parliament in 1875, the Supreme Court of Canada is Canada's final court of appeal. It serves Canadians by deciding legal issues of public importance, thereby contributing to the development of all branches of law applicable within Canada. The independence of the Court, the quality of its work and the esteem in which it is held both in Canada and abroad contribute significantly as foundations for a secure, strong and democratic country founded on the Rule of Law. The Supreme Court of Canada is an important national institution, positioned at the pinnacle of the judicial branch of government in Canada, separate from and independent of the executive and legislative branches of government.

The Office of the Registrar of the Supreme Court of Canada provides all necessary services and support for the Court to process, hear and decide cases. It also serves as the interface between litigants and the Court. The focus of this report is on the priorities and activities of the Office of the Registrar of the Supreme Court of Canada.

More detailed information on the Court's responsibilities, the hearing process and judgments is available on the Supreme Court of Canada website.

Responsibilities

In accordance with the Supreme Court Act, the Supreme Court of Canada consists of the Chief Justice and eight puisne judges, all of whom are appointed by the Governor in Council. The Supreme Court of Canada hears appeals from the decisions of the highest courts of final resort of the provinces and territories, as well as from the Federal Court of Appeal and the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada. In addition, the Court provides advisory opinions on questions referred to it by the Governor in Council. The importance of the Court's decisions for Canadian society is well recognized. The Court assures uniformity, consistency and correctness in the articulation, development and interpretation of legal principles throughout the Canadian judicial system. Its jurisdiction is derived from the Supreme Court Act and other Acts of Parliament, such as the Criminal Code.

The Registrar, also a Governor in Council appointee, heads the Office of the Registrar of the Supreme Court of Canada and is responsible for the management of its employees, resources and activities. The Supreme Court Act provides that the Registrar shall, under the direction of the Chief Justice, superintend the officers, clerks and employees of the Court, report and publish the judgments of the Court, as well as manage and control the library of the Court and purchase books therefore. The organization of the Office of the Registrar is depicted in the following diagram and further explained in the paragraphs that follow.

Organization Chart of the Office of the Registrar

Description of image

The chart shows the organizational structure of the Court. Under the direction of the Chief Justice, who is supported by the Executive Legal Officer, the Registrar is the Deputy Head of the Court. He is responsible for the Judicial Support and Protocol Sector and the Corporate Services Sector. The Registrar is seconded by the Deputy Registrar who is responsible for the Court Operations Sector and the Communications Services.

 

Judicial Support and Protocol Services Sector: The Judicial Support and Protocol Services Sector is responsible for the delivery of all judicial support services to the Chief Justice of Canada and the eight puisne judges of the Supreme Court of Canada, including protocol, the development and delivery of integrated judicial support programs and services, judicial administration, the Law Clerk program as well as judges' dining room services.

Court Operations Sector: Composed of the Law Branch, Reports Branch, Registry Branch and Library and Information Management Branch, this sector is responsible for the planning, direction and provision of legal advice and operational support to the Supreme Court judges respecting all aspects of the case management process from the initial filing to the final judgment on an appeal. This includes processing and recording proceedings, scheduling of cases, legal and jurilinguistic services, legal research and library services, legal editing services and publication of the Canada Supreme Court Reports. The Registry is the point of contact between the Court and litigants and it provides information and services to counsel and litigants, including unrepresented litigants. Information management services, including case related and corporate records information, are also provided by the Sector.

Communications Services: The Communications Services develop and implement communication strategies, plans and programs to increase public awareness and understanding of the Supreme Court of Canada, as well as to enhance internal communications within the Court.

Corporate Services Sector: Administrative and operational support for all the Court's judges and staff is provided by the Corporate Services Sector, which is responsible for: strategic, business and resource planning; corporate reporting; management accountability; modern management methods and tools; integrated risk management; finance; procurement; accommodation; administration (telecommunications, mail and printing services); human resources; security; health and safety; emergency management and preparedness; development, delivery and management of IT strategies, plans, policies, standards and procedures; as well as business continuity planning.

Strategic Outcome(s) and Program Activity Architecture

Strategic Outcome and Program Activity Architecture

Description of image

The Program Activity Architecture diagram illustrates the links between the Strategic Outcome and the Program Activities.

The Court's Strategic Outcome is: The administration of Canada's final court of appeal is effective and independent.

Three Program Activities contribute to the Strategic Outcome:

  • Court Operations
  • Process payment of various allowances to Judges of the Supreme Court of Canada, pursuant to the Judges Act
  • Internal Services

 

Organizational Priorities

The Office of the Registrar had two operational priorities for 2011-2012: (i) Business Transformation; and (ii) Providing effective e-access to information and services; as well as two management priorities: (i) Developing and implementing a sound information management program and (ii) Enhancing the security services program, to better meet the Court's overall security needs as well as the requirements of the recent Policy on Government Security.

Summary of Progress Against Priorities

Operational Priorities Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activities
Business Transformation Previously committed to The administration of Canada’s final court of appeal is effective and independent

The Business Transformation program is well under way with the establishment of its mission and infrastructure. Its mission is to assist the Court in becoming a fully electronic functioning court with reduced reliance on paper based processes, thereby increasing its productivity and effectiveness and be in a position to maximize the use of its resources. A Program Charter defining goals and priorities as well as governance has been approved and project selection work has started. As part of the infrastructure a Program Office has been set up; it is responsible for recommending priorities, tracking and reporting on projects, and identifying problems to the Steering Committee and Executive Committee.

Key Business Transformation milestones were identified as follows;

  • Parties can access complete case file documents, data and related information online
  • The public can access court information online.
  • Litigants can file documents electronically through a secure portal.
  • Historical information is protected and preserved in electronic format.
  • The electronic processing of cases.
  • Integrated document management and case management systems.
Operational Priorities Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activities
Provide effective e-access to information and services Previously committed to The administration of Canada’s final court of appeal is effective and independent

The continuing development of effective electronic access to information and services in the Supreme Court of Canada is progressing. This strategic priority is being advanced on several fronts with various systems being reviewed for renewal and/or implementation.

In 2011-12, the analysis of the current state of the Court’s application and data architecture was completed. This analysis focused on legacy systems (Case Management System (CMS), SCC Case etc) and recommended a new enterprise architecture approach. The new enterprise architecture would enable Court systems to interact and provide necessary connectivity to operational staff. Metadata and docket information would be shared between the CMS and the document management system, thereby alleviating the current burden of duplicate data entry. A SharePoint 2010 migration plan and a SharePoint 2007 fit-gap analysis with the Court’s document/records management needs were also developed.

Furthermore, during the course of the 2011-12 fiscal year, the Supreme Court documented business requirements for an Electronic Records Management System (ERMS) proof of concept, and drafted a Project Charter for a pilot of GC Docs, which is scheduled for the 3rd quarter of 2012-13.

Lastly, the Supreme Court digitized and added an additional 1,600 judgments dating back to 1906 to the Supreme Court judgments database, which is made available to the public at no charge on Lexum and on CanLII.

Management Priorities Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activities
Develop and implement a sound information management program Previously committed to The administration of Canada’s final court of appeal is effective and independent

The Office of the Registrar of the Supreme Court of Canada engaged all employees in an Information Management Awareness program over the course of 2011-12, with interactive learning exercises, contests and formal classroom training taking place in all sectors. A renewed suite of Information Management directives and guidelines were released to staff. This has resulted in an increased understanding of information management roles and responsibilities, improved knowledge sharing and a decrease in the number of transient records kept in unstructured electronic storage repositories, thus improving the effectiveness and efficiency of information gathering.

In addition to the Information Management Awareness program, the second phase of a clean up of the unstructured electronic drives was completed, resulting in the elimination of 32.7% of documents in the shared drives of the Registry, Law Branch, Judicial Support and Protocol Services and the Communication Section. The Supreme Court is now extremely well placed to pilot the electronic records management system referred to above in 2012-13.

The Information Management and Information Technology branches worked collaboratively to monitor the growth of unstructured data on the shared and personal drives, as well as to target training and awareness to individuals and user groups accordingly.

Management Priorities Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activities
Enhance the security program to better meet the needs of the Court as well as the requirements of the new Policy on Government Security Previously committed to The administration of Canada’s final court of appeal is effective and independent

Organizational structure was revised and staffing initiated.

Consultation held with stakeholders in the context of the policy suite renewal.

Continuation of the implementation of the level 2 business continuity plan and emergency management procedures.

Regular meetings held with partners on the Continuity of Constitutional Government (CCG).

Relationship maintained with the Long Term Vision and Plan committee to ensure interests of the SCC are taken into consideration.

The most serious vulnerabilities identified in a physical security assessment have started to be addressed on a priority basis.

Emergency procedures were strengthened.

Completion of Departmental Security Plan still planned for 2012-13 fiscal year.

Risk Analysis

The Office of the Registrar has continued to strive towards meeting its future challenges and to address its strategic priorities. The major factors affecting the Court's activities are detailed below, along with key risks.

Operating Environment

The Office of the Registrar is faced with both operational and reputational risks. Operational risks are those associated with operational and organizational capabilities to deal with change affecting administrative processes, people management, financial and information processing, technology, security and business continuity. Reputational risks are associated with risks that affect the Court's reputation and public confidence in its ability to fulfill its mandate.

Key risks

Description of Risk Mitigation Strategies Applied Materialized (Yes/No)
Change management and business transformation: While the focus of the last several years has been on modernization of the Courtroom and enhancing electronic access to the public and litigants, paper-based processes continue to be required, leading to potentially high employee expectations and low morale affecting productivity.
  • Renewed governance – Executive Committee, Extended Management Committee and Change Advisory Board
  • Grouping of four core branches into the Court Operations Sector (Registry, Law, Reports and Library and Information Management)
Yes, in part. There has been an increase in stress related leave and there is significant pressure on staff as a result the continuing need to duplicate processes in both print and electronic environments. The mitigation strategies will bring long term benefits and the short term has seen an increase in teamwork and communication between work units that will yield results in future years.
Information Management: The increasingly complex cases before the Court plus the numerous sources of available information and increasing demands for access to case related information means that the Office of the Registrar must provide an improved information management program.
  • Annual business and strategic planning processes
  • Clarification of accountabilities with the realignment of the Information Management program
  • Identification of Information Management as a management priority
No
Aging IT Systems: There is a need to ensure that older, mission critical systems (such as the CMS and SCC Case) are ported to a more up-to-date platform to ensure their sustainability, increase manageability and optimize interoperability with newer systems.
  • IT Strategic Plan and related investment plan
Yes. Given financial constraints, the Supreme Court was not able to perform some required computer upgrades (e.g. Windows 7)
People Management: Planned and unplanned departures of staff in key positions is expected to continue and this is made more serious by difficulties in recruiting and retaining skilled staff, particularly in shortage areas such as jurilinguists.
  • Human resources planning by sectors
  • SCC Policy on learning, training and development
  • Reliance on external sources as required
  • Development and implementation of knowledge transfer strategies
No
Delivery of Security Services: The security profile of the SCC is continuously elevated due to its central role amongst the institutions of government. It is often difficult to balance the desire for an "open Court" and the fact that the Supreme Court Building is a popular tourist destination, on one hand, with the requirement to provide suitable security for judges, staff and visitors, on the other
  • Having in place an adequate emergency organizational structure
  • Performing threat and risk assessments
  • Working to establish better collaboration and communication between RCMP and the Security Services Branch of the Office of the Registrar
  • Identifying enhancements to the security services program as a management priority
No
Property Deterioration: The Supreme Court of Canada building is aging, and consequently there is a growing risk of infrastructure and building systems failure as a result of continuing property deterioration.
  • Working with Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGCS) to plan and execute a major building rehabilitation project
No

Summary of Performance

The 2011-12 Financial Resources table below shows how Parliament approved resources for the Office of the Registrar and the changes in resources derived from supplementary estimates and other authorities, as well as how funds were spent. The 2011-12 Human Resources table (also below) displays the planned and actual full-time equivalents.

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
29.7 32.8 31.5

 

2011-12 Human Resources (full-time equivalents - [FTEs])
Planned Actual Difference
215 210 5

Summary of Performance Tables

Progress Toward Strategic Outcome
Strategic Outcome: The administration of Canada's final court of appeal is effective and independent.
Performance Indicators Targets 2011-12 Performance
Level of satisfaction among judges regarding quality of service Annual and regularly scheduled interviews with Judges

Target: "Satisfied" level
Target met: Following regular meetings and interviews between the members of the Executive Committee and the Court, the Judges indicated that they were satisfied with the level of service provided to them.
Level of satisfaction among lawyers regarding quality of service Annual interviews with lawyers' committees

Target: "Satisfied" level
Target exceeded: Comments received from lawyers at meetings of the Supreme Court of Canada / Canadian Bar Association Liaison Committee and the Court / Ottawa Agents Practice and Procedures Committee were unanimous in expressing the view that the quality of service of the Court Registry is excellent, and accordingly there is a high level of satisfaction on their part.

 

Performance Summary, Excluding Internal Services
Program Activity 2010-11
Actual
Spending
2011-12 ($ millions) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Court Operations 18.6 14.3 14.3 15.4 14.8 Strong and independent democratic institutions
Process payment of various allowances to the Supreme Court Judges Pursuant to the Judges Act - 5.6 5.6 5.7 5.7 Strong and independent democratic institutions
Total 18.6 19.9 19.9 21.1 20.5  

 

Performance Summary for Internal Services
Program Activity 2010-11
Actual
Spending
2011-12 ($ millions)
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities *
Actual
Spending *
Internal Services 10.4 9.8 9.8 11.7 11.0

* Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada, if applicable.

Expenditure Profile

Departmental Spending Trend

Description of image

Spending Trend - The diagram illustrates the variations, in millions of dollars, in actual spending from 2009-10 to 2011-12, forecast spending for 2012-13, and planned spending from 2013-14 to 2015-16.

Actual Spending - Indicates the amounts the Department spent: $29.0 million in 2009-10, $30.3 million in 2010-11, and $31.5 million in 2011-12.

Forecast Spending – Indicates the amount the Department is forecasting to spend in 2012-13: $31.2 million.

Planned Spending – Indicates the amounts the Department is planning to spend: $32.1 million in 2013-14, $31.0 million in 2014-15, and $31.4 million in 2015-16.

 

The Supreme Court of Canada has received fairly stable reference levels for the three fiscal years shown in the graph above. Actual spending has varied slightly between 2010-11 and 2011-12, with higher spending noted in 2011-12. The increase of 1.2M (over 2010-11) in personnel costs was due to the immediate settlement of severance pay and general increases to overall personnel costs. Total Authorities in all years exceed Main Estimates due to overall funding received within each respective year.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the Supreme Court of Canada's statutory and non-statutory voted expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2012 (Volume II). An electronic version of the Public Accounts is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.


Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome

The administration of Canada's final court of appeal is effective and independent.

Program Activity: Court Operations

Program Activity Description

In order to render decisions, the Court requires the support of the Office of the Registrar in the management of cases from the receipt of an application for leave to appeal up to and including the release of a judgment on appeal. This support includes providing services to the litigants; reviewing applications for leave to appeal and preparing advice as to whether leave to appeal should be granted; preparing summaries of the leave applications; providing procedural advice; reviewing and summarizing factums where leave to appeal is granted; receiving, controlling and preserving all incoming case documentation; tracking various time periods to ensure compliance by the parties with the Rules of the Supreme Court of Canada; recording proceedings on appeals; answering queries with regard to cases; editing and summarizing decisions of the Court; publishing decisions in the Supreme Court Reports, in accordance with the Supreme Court Act; and providing law library services with an extensive collection in both print and electronic formats to support legal research undertaken by users within the Court and members of the legal community.

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
14.3 15.4 14.8

 

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
143 152 9

 

Program Activity Performance Summary
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Performance Status
Cases processed without delay Number of weeks between filing of application for leave and decision on application for leave 14 weeks Partially met
Number of months between hearing and judgment 6 months Met
Access to Court services and information % of lawyers and unrepresented litigants that were “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with Registry Services 95% Exceeded
Courtroom systems reliability Number of hearing disruptions for technical reasons per year 0 Met
Access to reference information % of factual/bibliographic requests for reference assistance responded to within service standard of 1 working day 95% Met
% of complex/substantive requests for reference assistance responded to by date required by client 95% Exceeded
% of users that were “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with library services 95% Exceeded
% of citations in judgments that are in the collection 85% Exceeded

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

Access to Reference Information

Performance Summary

In 2011, there was a minor increase in the average time lapse for deciding leave to appeal applications. Twenty-five percent were decided within three months, below the targeted levels and 93% within six months. The average time lapse between the date leave to appeal was granted (or a notice of appeal as of right was filed) and the hearing of a case was just less than nine months, an increase from 2010. This was offset by the one month decrease in the average time lapse between the hearing of a case and judgment. Accordingly, in 2011, the time lapse between filing of an application for leave to appeal, or notice of appeal as of right, and judgment on appeal was nineteen months, comparable to 2010.

Two client satisfaction surveys were administered in 2011-12, one during the month of December 2011 to any user who had contact with the Reference services of the Library for substantive or bibliographic research, as well as an exit survey administered in July and August 2011, when the law clerks, being the Library's primary user group, depart from the Court. In total, 100% of the clients responded that they received the information requested, on time, and that the information provided resulted in time savings. One respondent added, "Il aurait fallu que je fasse la recherche moi-même, et je ne suis pas très bonne en recherche, alors j'aurais gaspillé beaucoup de temps", confirming that the efficiency of the Library research services was a real time saver. This was echoed by another respondent as follows: "The library staff here are exceptional. I looked for two hours to find something and was unsuccessful. They found it for me in 25 minutes!" Overall, satisfaction with the Library service was very high.

Performance Analysis

The continued focus in the Library has been aimed at implementing a new organizational model with mixed library and information management responsibilities for staff, and in delivering on the Court's Enterprise IM Awareness strategy, which was a new service offering. There have been no significant changes in the delivery of Library services to the members of the Court or to the internal staff of the Supreme Court.

We continue to monitor the impact of inflationary increases on the Library's collections, through statistical analysis of the citations which appear in the Supreme Court Reports. Based on this analysis, the Library collection is still able to meet the Court's information needs, although our ability to meet that need has shifted slightly, with slightly more (0.9%) case law now supplied from our electronic collections than previously. However, a very high percentage of citations to legislation and secondary material (99% and 79.2% respectively) are drawn from the Library's print collection. For secondary sources, this is an increase of 12.5% over last year's rate. Of the balance, the bulk of the secondary sources not in the print collection (more than half at 68%) were found online in 2011-12. In total, 100% of the items not in our collection were located through interlibrary loans, e-resources or on microfiche.

In 2011-12, there were 1,946 cited sources for the 71 Court cases published in 2011. Citations to foreign and international case law and legislation were on the increase compared to 2010, while citations of foreign secondary sources were not as numerous. Once again, sources from the United Kingdom, followed by the United States, together accounted for the bulk of the foreign citations.

Lessons Learned

Information Management governance was reviewed in January 2012 so as to re-align roles and responsibilities based on the organizational changes which had taken place over the course of the year. We are pleased to report that open communications between the Information Management (IM) and the Information Technology (IT) branches, as well as constant monitoring and re-enforcing of best practices have had a positive outcome on overall IM program. This will carry over into projects planned for 2012-13, including the pilot project for electronic records management systems implementation.

Similarly, on the Business Transformation Program, a strong governance structure and the regular meetings of the Program Office ensure the communication that is critical to the success of the project. It also became apparent that measures have to be put in place to allow key staff to be released from operational duties to focus on the business transformation. Over time, this will ensure that we can achieve the goals while managing the transition and avoiding undue stress on staff.

Program Activity: Process payment of various allowances to Judges of the Supreme Court of Canada, pursuant to the Judges Act

Program Activity Description

The Judges Act is an Act respecting all federally appointed judges, and thereby applies to the judges of the Supreme Court of Canada. With respect to the Office of the Registrar of the Supreme Court the Judges Act specifies the salaries of the Supreme Court judges, and prescribes other payments to be made to judges, namely allowances, removal, meeting, conference and seminars and annuities. The Office of the Registrar processes these payments as required in the Judges Act.

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
5.6 5.7 5.7

 

2011-12 Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
Planned* Actual* Difference
0 0 0

* Note: No FTEs are assigned to this program activity because it relates to the Court's judges who in turn are not counted in the Supreme Court's FTE total numbers.

Program Activity Performance Summary
Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets Performance
Status
Timely and accurate processing of payments % of payments processed within service standards 95% Exceeded
% of errors on payments 2% Mostly met

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

Performance Summary

The Office of the Registrar achieved a level of 96% for the timely processing of payments pursuant to the Judges Act within its service standards of five days and incurred an error rate of 4% on its accuracy level for the processing of these payments.

Performance Analysis

For the past two years, the Office of the Registrar has achieved a level of 96% for the timely processing of its payments to judges. A system has been put in place to carefully monitor outstanding payments so as to ensure the timely reimbursement of judges' claims under various allowances. More frequent payments were issued in order to stay within the targeted timeframes. Efforts will continue to maintain or surpass the target of 95%.

Although an independent file review has not recently been conducted, an assessment of the corrective entries was used as a basis in determining whether or not the Office of the Registrar met its target of an error rate of 2% or less. Of 477 transactions, 20 adjusting entries were needed to correct various errors, resulting in an error rate of 4%. The adjustments consisted mostly of errors in financial coding, thus not impacting directly on the payment to the recipients. The Office of the Registrar will continue to strive towards reducing its error rate.

Lessons Learned

There was an increase in judges' expense claims in 2011/12 due to the retirement of and subsequent arrival of two judges. As a result, the Office of the Registrar did not meet its actual goal for the percentage of errors on payments to judges. However, the vast majority of any errors were financial coding errors, none of which affected the Office of the Registrar's service levels. The processes in place (reconciliation and frequent reporting) have allowed for early detection of errors, in particular financial coding errors, and corrective action is taken immediately. More time and effort will be dedicated to reviewing and processing these claims in the future in order to reduce the error rate and to achieve our target of 2%.

Program Activity: Internal Services

Program Activity Description

The Internal Services Program Activity supports all strategic outcomes and is common across government. Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Material Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
9.8 11.7 11.0

 

2011–12 Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
Planned Actual Difference
72 58 14

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Highlights

The financial Statements can be found on the Supreme Court of Canada's website.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2012
($ millions)
Change $ 2011-12 2010-11
Total net liabilities (0.7) 6.6 7.3
Total net financial assets (0.2) 3.5 3.7
Departmental net debt (0.5) 3.1 3.6
Total non-financial assets (1.3) 2.4 3.7
Departmental net financial position (0.8) (0.7) 0.1

 

Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2012*
($ millions)
Change % 2011-12 2010-11
Total expenses 2 41.9 41.2
Total revenues - - -
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers - 41.9 41.2
Departmental net financial position (800) (0.7) 0.1

*Adoption of New Accounting Policies

The Office of the Registrar adopted the revised Treasury Board Accounting Standard (TBAS) 1.2: Departmental and Agency Financial Statements, which is effective for the 2011-12 fiscal year. The major change required by the adoption of the revised TBAS 1.2 is the presentation of financial assets, expenses and revenues held on behalf of government. The government funding is now included in the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position, resulting in a Departmental Net Financial Position total which agrees with the total of the Statement of Financial Position. The adoption of this new Treasury Board accounting policy has been accounted for retroactively, with a resulting change to the 2010-11 amounts.

Financial Highlights - Charts and Graphs

Liabilities by Type

Description of image

Liabilities by type (millions)- This pie chart is divided into four pieces. The two largest pieces of the pie are assigned to Employee Future Benefits and Other Liabilities which each represent $2.1M of the $6.6M total liabilities. The Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities represent $1.5M and the Vacation Pay and Compensatory Leave, $0.9M.

 

Total liabilities were $6.6M at the end of 2011-12, a decrease of $0.7M (9.4%) over the total liabilities of $7.3M for 2010-11. Employee Future Benefits and Other Liabilities represent the largest portion of liabilities at $4.2M (64%).

Assets by Type

Description of image

Assets by type (millions)- This pie chart is divided into four pieces. The largest section is attributed to Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund and represents $3.4M of the $5.9M total assets. The Tangible Capital Assets represent $2.3M and the Accounts Receivable and Advances and the Prepaid Expenses each represent $0.1M.

 

Total assets were $5.9M at the end of 2011-12, a decrease of $1.5M (19.8%) over the total assets of $7.4M for 2010-11. Financial Assets (Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund and Accounts Receivable and Advances) have decreased by $0.2M (4.7%) while Non Financial Assets (Tangible Capital Assets and Prepaid Expenses) have decreased by $1.3M (35.0%) compared to 2010-11.

Expenses by type

Description of image

Expenses by type (millions)This pie chart shows the 2011-2012 expenses by two major categories: Salaries and Employee Benefits representing $25.8M and Other Operating Expenditures representing $16.1M of the $41.9M total expenses.

 

Total expenses were $41.9M for 2011-12: an increase of $0.7M (1.8%) over the total expenses of $41.2M for 2010-11. The majority of the funds ($25.8M or 61.0%) were spent on Salaries and Employee Benefits in 2011-12.

Financial Statements

The financial Statements can be found on the Supreme Court of Canada's website.

List of Supplementary Information Tables

Electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2011-12 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the Supreme Court of Canada's website.


Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Organizational Contact Information

Supreme Court of Canada Building
301 Wellington Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0J1

General Enquiries
Telephone: (613) 995-4330
Fax: (613) 996-3063
Email: reception@scc-csc.ca

Roger Bilodeau, Q.C. - Registrar
Telephone: (613) 996-9277
Email: reception@scc-csc.ca

Mary McFadyen - Deputy Registrar
Telephone: (613) 996-7521
Email: reception@scc-csc.ca

Barbara Kincaid - General Counsel
Telephone: (613) 996-7721
Email: Barbara.Kincaid@scc-csc.ca

Catherine Laforce - Director General, Corporate Services Sector
Telephone: (613) 947-0682
Email: Catherine.Laforce@scc-csc.ca

Michel Gallant - Director, Judicial Support and Protocol Sector
Telephone: (613) 996-4841
Email: Michel.Gallant@scc-csc.ca

Listing of Statutory and Departmental Reports

Supreme Court Reports
Pursuant to Section 17 of the Supreme Court Act, the Registrar or the Deputy Registrar, as the Chief Justice directs, is responsible for the publication of the judgments of the Court in the Canada Supreme Court Reports, which include all the reasons for judgment rendered by the Court in a given calendar year.

Legislation Administered

Supreme Court Act, R.S.C., 1985, C.S-26 as amended
Judges Act, R.S.C., 1985, C.J-1 as amended

Endnotes

  1. Supreme Court of Canada
  2. Lexum
  3. CANLII
  4. Public Works and Government Services Canada
  5. Supreme Court of Canada financial statements
  6. Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat